Undergraduate Summer Courses

2021 Summer St. George Campus Course Descriptions

For courses with tutorials, please also see the Arts and Science timetable. Sessional dates are available on the Faculty of Arts & Science calendar.

Summer term Undergraduate Classes begin May 3, 2021

Note: If the courses listed below is in conflict with the Arts & Science timetable, the information on the timetable takes priority.

RLG317H1S Religious Violence and Nonviolence

David Perley (SessIII)

Term: Summer

Description: Religious violence and nonviolence as they emerge in the tension between strict adherence to tradition and individual actions of charismatic figures. The place of violence and nonviolence in selected faith traditions.

RLG387H1S Religion and Science

Course Instructor

Term: Summer

Description: Course explores issues at the intersection of religion and science which may include such topics as evolution and the assessment of its religious significance by different traditions, conceptions of God held by scientists (theism, pantheism, panentheism), ethical issues raised by scientific or technological developments ( cloning or embryonic stem cell research), philosophical analysis of religious and scientific discourses.

RLG232H1F Religion and Film

Course Instructor

Term: Summer

Description: The role of film as a mediator of thought and experience concerning religious worldviews. The ways in which movies relate to humanity's quest to understand itself and its place in the universe are considered in this regard, along with the challenge which modernity presents to this task. Of central concern is the capacity of film to address religious issues through visual symbolic forms.

RLG393H1F Graphic Religion: Myth and the Spiritual in Graphic Novels

David Perley (SessIII)

Term: Summer

Description: Survey of themes connecting religious ideas, symbols, and representations with graphic novels and sequential art. The course will explore techniques of story-telling in mythic and visual representations in religious traditions and explore how these techniques and images are mirrored within popular comic-style (sequential) art.